Author permission FAQ

Q. Do I need permission to reuse material:

This section answers whether or not you need permission to reuse material appearing in your article, if a credit line needs to be added to the figure/table caption, and if a form is available to request permission from the original copyright holder/publisher.

A. For my own figure or table previously published in an AIP Publishing journal?

No. You do not need permission from AIP Publishing to reuse material for one AIP Publishing-owned journal that was previously published in another AIP Publishing-owned journal. However, you must include an appropriate credit line, stating the original source. See “What is a credit line and where does it go?”

Credit line needed? Yes

Form available for download? No

B. For my own figure or table previously published in a non-AIP Publishing journal?

Maybe. Most publishers allow authors to reuse their own material without written permission; however, policies vary. Please check the copyright agreement you signed with the publisher as well as the publisher’s website for information. If you are unsure, please contact the publisher directly. It is your responsibility to ensure that proper procedures are followed. See “How do I obtain permissions?”

Credit line needed? Yes

Form available for download? Yes

C. For a figure or table that is not mine but was published in another AIP Publishing journal?

No. You do not need permission from AIP Publishing to reuse material for one AIP Publishing-owned journal that was previously published in another AIP Publishing-owned journal, but you must include an appropriate credit line stating the original source.

As a courtesy, we ask that you inform at least one of the authors of the material of your intended reuse.

Credit line needed? Yes

Form available for download? Yes

D. For a previously published figure, photograph, image, table, etc., from another source that is not mine?

Yes. If you are including material taken from another source, it is your responsibility to obtain written permission for that material directly from the copyright holder. See “How do I obtain permissions?”

Credit line needed? Yes

Form available for download? Yes

E. For an image I’ve taken from the Internet?

Yes. Images appearing on the Internet are under copyright, and care must be taken to locate the copyright holder and obtain permission. In most cases, you can look to the credit line of the image for information. When no credit line appears, you may wish to contact the administrator of the site where the image appears. If you are unable to locate the copyright holder, you must not use the material. Please note: when using screen shots, separate permission may be required for each individual element (images, photos, text, etc.).

Credit line needed? Yes

Form available for download? Yes

F. To adapt or redraw tables, diagrams, charts, lists, etc. when an exact or very close adaption is used?

Yes. Permission is still needed from the copyright holder if you are adapting or redrawing material. If you are significantly modifying the material so as to create a new and unique work that would be eligible for copyright protection on its own, then permission is not needed.

Credit line needed? Yes

Form available for download? Yes

G. For material in the public domain?

No. The public domain refers to works that are not protected by copyright and are publicly available. They may be used by anyone, anywhere, anytime without permission, license, or royalty payment. There are several categories of works that fall into the public domain: works for which the term of copyright has expired; works for which the copyright has been abandoned or not renewed; works for which the copyright holder has waived his/her rights; works not eligible for protection, such as U.S. Government works.

Credit line needed? Yes

Form available for download? No

H. For Official U.S. government publications?

No. Any work prepared by an officer or employee of the United States Government as part of that person’s official duties is considered a “Government” work. “Official duties” do not include work done at a government officer’s or employee’s own volition, even if the subject matter is government work in his professional field, so long as the work was not required as part of the individual’s official job. Work done by government contractors or grantees receiving government funding is not considered a “Government” work. Those works are protected by copyright and are not in the public domain.

Credit line needed? Yes

Form available for download? No

Q. Must permission be in writing?

It is imperative that written permission be obtained and that all phases of the permission process are documented. A form may be completed that the publisher can approve and return, or an email granting the permission is sufficient. Whatever method is employed, authors must be sure that all necessary information is included. Authors are also encouraged to use the RightsLink system for obtaining permission. See “How do I obtain permission?”

Q. How do I obtain permissions?

Step 1. If the previously published material was not published in an AIP Publishing-owned journal, then check the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink Service to see if the original journal or publisher is a participant. RightsLink is a convenient web-based method of obtaining permission to reuse material from a wide variety of participating publishers. Authors are encouraged to set up individual accounts with RightsLink; there is no charge to establish an account. A link to participating publishers may be found within the RightsLink web pages.

Step 2. If the previously published material was not published in an AIP Publishing-owned journal and the original publisher is not a participant with RightsLink, then visit the original publisher’s website to find their guidelines for permissions and online permissions request form. If you need to contact the original publisher via e-mail, mail, or fax, you may use our request form. Please be sure to fill out the form completely.

Step 3. Obtain permission for reuse from the original publisher and include the required credit line in the figure or table caption.

Q. What is a credit line and where does it go?

It is the author’s responsibility to include, in the submitted manuscript, the appropriate credit line as outlined by the original publisher. Contact the original publisher immediately upon deciding to include previously published material in your manuscript.

In response to your request, the original publisher will provide you with their preferred wording for the credit line (in most cases). A credit line consisting only of “Used with permission” is not sufficient. An example of a typical complete credit line appears as:

Reproduced with permission from J. Org. Chem. 63, 99 (1998). Copyright 1998 American Chemical Society.

Note that even when reusing material in the public domain (for which obtaining permission does not apply), you must include an appropriate credit line, which states the original source. An example of an appropriate credit line for material in the public domain follows:

Reprinted from A. H. Harvey and J. C. Bellows, Evaluation and Correlation of Steam Solubility Data for Salts and Minerals of Interest in the Power Industry, NIST Technical Note 1387 (U.S. GPO, Washington, DC, 1997).

For figures, photographs, covers, or tables, the credit line may appear with the material, in a footnote, or in the reference list.

Q. What do I do with the permissions once I receive them?

Upload them to the manuscript submission site when you upload your revised manuscript and rebuttal letter. Each permission must be labeled according to the figure/table in the revised manuscript. For example, if you have permission for Fig. 1, upload the permission using the Copyright/Permissions link and follow the labeling convention.

Q. How do I label figure permissions?

In the box titled Object Title, please tell us the figure(s) that the permission is for in the manuscript you are submitting and the reference that it goes to.

Examples:

Fig. 1 (Ref. 7)

Figs. 1, 2, 6 (Ref. 10)

Q. Whom do I contact if I have any questions?

Rights and Permissions
AIP Publishing
1305 Walt Whitman Road
Suite 300
Melville, NY 11747-4502
Telephone: +1 516-576-2268
rights [at] aip.org